190 Years Old Tortoise Hold Guinness World Record For Being The World's Oldest Living Land Animal

190 Years Old Tortoise
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190 Years Old Tortoise Hold Guinness World Record For Being The World's Oldest Living Land Animal

Highlights

  • The Guinness Book of World Records has certified Jonathan, a 190-year-old tortoise, as the world's oldest living land animal.
  • His age is estimatedly based on the fact that while he came in St Helena from the Seychelles in 1882, he was completely developed and thereby at least 50 years old.

The Guinness Book of World Records has certified Jonathan, a 190-year-old tortoise, as the world's oldest living land animal. In the year 2022, the tortoise on St Helena Island, British Overseas Territory, had turned 190 years old and been celebrated.

According to sources, Jonathan, who is considered to have been born in 1832. His age is estimatedly based on the fact that while he came in St Helena from the Seychelles in 1882, he was completely developed and thereby at least 50 years old.


Joe Hollins is his veterinary, however, his hearing is superb, and he enjoys being in the presence of humans. He responds favourably to his vet Joe Hollins' voice because he links him with his favourites including his feasts. As he gets older, he loses his sense of smell and becomes blind. to reinforce his calories, vitamins, minerals, and trace substances, the veterinary staff continues to feed him by manually once every week .

Cabbage, cucumber, carrot, apple, and other seasonal fruits are among Jonathan's favourites. He enjoys bananas, although they tend to clog his mouth. Lettuce hearts are a popular snack, despite their lack of nutritional value.

According to the official record title, he is certainly more older than it is estimated. He is the oldest chelonian, which includes all turtles, terrapins, and tortoises.

Meanwhile, studies revealed that some tortoises, like the Galápagos giant tortoise, can evolve to be more than 1.2 metres long, while others, like the Speckled cape tortoise, have shells that are only 6.8 centimetres long. Tortoises are the world's longest-living terrestrial animals, albeit the longest-living tortoise species is a point of contention. Tortoises in the Galapagos Islands have been known to survive for over 150 years, but an Aldabra gigantic tortoise named Adwaita is thought to have lived for almost 255 years. Most tortoise species have a lifespan of 80–150 years.

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